Antibiotic use, perceptions differ among patients and providers

Regarding antibiotic use for upper respiratory infections, patients and providers have different perceptions, behaviors, and knowledge.
Regarding antibiotic use for upper respiratory infections, patients and providers have different perceptions, behaviors, and knowledge.

SAN ANTONIO—Patients and providers have differing perceptions and behaviors regarding antibiotic use for upper respiratory infections (URIs), according to research presented at the 2016 annual meeting of the American Academy of PAs (AAPA).

“Proper patient education should focus on improving knowledge regarding antibiotics and their indications, while proper provider education should focus on eliminating misconception regarding patients' expectations,” said the presenters.

The survey included demographic information and 39 5-point Likert scale items, with 13 knowledge, 13 perception, and 13 behavior items.

The results indicated a difference in knowledge of antibiotic use for URIs between patients (k=3.5/5.0) and providers (k=4.4/5.0). In 20 out of 26 items, patients and providers showed differences between perception and behavior of antibiotic use.

Patients showed a positive correlation between their knowledge and perception/behavior regarding antibiotics in 19 out of 26 items, whereas among providers, only 3 out of 26 items showed a positive correlation between knowledge and perception/behavior.

Reference

  1. Dweck J, Gutman A, Sher M, et al. Overuse of antibiotics for URIs: Who is to blame? ePoster presented at: 2016 annual meeting of the American Academy of PAs (AAPA); May 14-18, 2016; San Antonio, TX.
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