Acne

  • Acne vulgaris

    Acne vulgaris

    Acne vulgaris pustules are caused by the blockage of hair follicles by plugs of dried sebum. This type of acne occurs on the face, chest, and back and is most common in young men.

  • Acne vulgaris

    Acne vulgaris

    The mild form of acne vulgaris disappears in adulthood. More persistant, chronic acne can result in infected cysts and scarring of the skin.

  • Acne rosacea

    Acne rosacea

    Acne rosacea is a skin disorder that can affect the blood vessels of the face, causing a flushed appearance.

  • Acne rosacea

    Acne rosacea

    Rosacea usually begins with temporary flushing and can develop into a permanent redness, often accompanied by pustules resembling acne.

  • Folliculitis

    Folliculitis

    Folliculitis is an infection of the hair follicles caused by friction from clothing, blockage of the follicle, or shaving.

  • Folliculitis

    Folliculitis

    Treatment of inflamed hair follicles includes frequent washing and use of antibiotics.

  • Acne conglobata

    Acne conglobata

    Acne conglobata is a chronic and severe form of acne vulgaris characterized by deep abscesses, inflammation, skin damage, and scarring.

  • Acne fulminans

    Acne fulminans

    Characteristics of acne fulminans include sudden onset, severe and often ulcerating acne, fever, polyarthritis, and failure to respond to antibacterial therapy.

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Acne, a general name given to a skin disorder in which the sebaceous glands become inflamed, comes in a number of types.

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