Chemotherapy Induced Alopecia (CIA)

  • Slide 1: The Importance of Hair

    Slide 1: The Importance of Hair

    Hair has been a social symbol throughout time, cultivating perceptions of age, social status, beliefs, and more importantly, individuality and a sense of attractiveness.<sup>1</sup>

  • Slide 2: The Patient’s Point of View

    Slide 2: The Patient’s Point of View

    Chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA) is one of the more troubling aspects of chemotherapy to patients.<sup>2</sup> While hair loss may seem trivial, it can lead to poor self esteem and ultimately unwanted psychological effects.<sup>2</sup>

  • Slide 3: Hair Anatomy and Physiology

    Slide 3: Hair Anatomy and Physiology

    Normal hair growth is comprised of three phases: 1) Anagen, 2) Catagen and 3) Telogen.<sup>3</sup> Exogen then occurs when hair is released from the follicle.<sup>3</sup>

  • Slide 4: Pathophysiology of CIA

    Slide 4: Pathophysiology of CIA

    The anagen phase is primarily affected in CIA, which is thought to result from the disruption of matrix cells proliferation and Pohl-Pinkus constrictions, which is characterized by diminished follicle function.<sup>3</sup>

  • Slide 5: Chemotherapeutic Agents Causing CIA

    Slide 5: Chemotherapeutic Agents Causing CIA

    This is a listing of some agents that may cause CIA.<sup>6</sup>

  • Slide 6: Grading of CIA

    Slide 6: Grading of CIA

    CIA is graded based by severity and need for camouflage. Grade 1 is defined by hair loss of >50% that is noticeable upon close inspection; grade 2 is characterized by hair loss of >50% that is readily noticeable, requires camouflage to conceal loss, and causes psychosocial impact.<sup>5</sup>

  • Slide 7: Topical Treatments

    Slide 7: Topical Treatments

    Minoxidil therapy requires daily application, as discontinuation can lead to loss of benefits obtained.<sup>7</sup>

  • Slide 8: Scalp Cooling as Treatment for CIA

    Slide 8: Scalp Cooling as Treatment for CIA

    Scalp cooling may help reduce hair loss in some patients receiving chemotherapy.<sup>8</sup>

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Compared to the severe adverse effects of chemotherapy, chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA) is surprisingly one of the more troubling aspects of chemotherapy to patients. Learn more about it with this slideshow.

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