Liver grafts from first-degree relatives do not increase recurrence risk

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The source of a patient's liver transplant did not significantly affect rates of disease recurrence.
The source of a patient's liver transplant did not significantly affect rates of disease recurrence.

HealthDay News — In liver transplantation (LT), patients who receive living donor grafts from first-degree relatives due to autoimmune liver diseases are not prone to increased disease recurrence, compared to those who receive grafts from distant/unrelated donors and deceased donors, according to a study published online April 18 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

Aloysious D. Aravinthan, MBBS, of the University of Toronto, and colleagues studied 263 patients who underwent a first LT in the Toronto liver transplant program between January 2000 and March 2015 for autoimmune liver diseases. Patients had at least 6 months of post-LT follow-up.

The researchers found that 72 patients (27%) received a graft from a first-degree living-related donor, 56 (21%) from a distant/unrelated living donor, and 135 (51%) from a deceased donor. Recurrence occurred in 20% of patients. Source of LT did not significantly affect recurrence rates. Similarly, the source of the liver did not significantly affect time to recurrence, recurrence-related graft failure, graft survival, or patient survival.

"This study indicates that recipients with autoimmune liver diseases, who receive grafts from first-degree relatives are not disadvantaged by increased disease recurrence, reduced graft survival or reduced patient survival compared to those who receive grafts from distant/unrelated donors and deceased donors," the authors write.

Reference

  1. Aravinthan AD, Doyle AC, Issachar A, et al. First-degree living-related donor liver transplantation in autoimmune liver diseases. Am J Transplant. 2016; doi: 10.1111/ajt.13828
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