How many teens, young adults are being tested for HIV?

How many teens are being tested for HIV?
How many teens are being tested for HIV?

HealthDay News -- Nearly one-fifth of teens and younger adults in the United States have been tested recently for HIV, federal health officials reported in a National Center for Health Statistics briefing.

To investigate the rate of HIV testing among teens and young adults, Casey E. Copen, MPH, PhD, of the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), and colleagues analyzed data from 5,601 females and 4,815 males, aged 15 to 44 years, who took part in the 2011 to 2013 National Survey of Family Growth.

Of the patients, 19% had undergone HIV testing in the past year, an increase from 17% in both 2002 and 2006 to 2010. HIV testing rates in 2011 to 2013 were 22% for females and 16% for males, compared with 20% for females in 2002.

Females aged 25 to 34 years were most likely to have been tested (29%), followed by females aged 15 to 24 years (22%) and those aged 35 to 44 years (16%). Black females were more likely to have been tested (45%) than Hispanics (21%) or whites (16%).

Among females aged 22 to 44 years, those with a high school diploma or less were more likely to have been tested (26%) than those with some college (25%) or those with a bachelor's degree or higher (20%). Males aged 25 to 34 years were more likely to have been tested (19%) than those ages 35 to 44 (13%) and those ages 15 to 24 (16%). Black males were more likely to have been tested (33%) than Hispanics (15%) or whites (13%). Education had little effect on rates of HIV testing among men.

Females who had same-sex contact in the past year were more likely to have been tested for HIV (35%) than those with any opposite-sex contact (approximately 25%). Slightly less than 40% of males who had any same-sex contact in the past year had been tested, compared with 20% who had any opposite-sex contact.

Twenty-six percent of females who had vaginal intercourse or oral sex with a male were tested, compared with 18% of males who had vaginal or oral sex with a female. Rates of HIV testing were similar for females and males who had anal sex with an opposite-sex partner (25% and 23%, respectively), or any same-sex contact in the past year (35% and 38%, respectively).

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