Rate of vitamin D deficiency increased in children from 2000 to 2014

The rate of diagnosis of vitamin D deficiency in children has increased over the past decade.
The rate of diagnosis of vitamin D deficiency in children has increased over the past decade.

(HealthDay News) — From 2000 to 2014 there was an increase in the rate of vitamin D deficiency diagnosis among children, according to a study published online in Pediatrics.

Emre Basatemur, MBBS, from the Institute of Child Health at University College London, and colleagues conducted a cohort study using primary care records of 711,788 children aged 0 to 17 years to examine the incidence rates for diagnosis of vitamin D deficiency every year from 2000 to 2014.

 

The researchers found that from 2000 to 2014 there was an increase in the crude rate of vitamin D deficiency diagnosis from 3.14 to 261 per 100,000 person-years. Between 2008 and 2014 there was a 15-fold increase in diagnosis after accounting for changes in demographic characteristics. There were independent associations between older age (≥10 years), nonwhite ethnicity, and social deprivation and higher rates of diagnosis. Diagnosis rates were higher in boys vs girls aged <5 years, while rates were higher in girls aged ≥10 years.

"There has been a marked increase in diagnosis of vitamin D deficiency in children over the past decade," the authors write. "Future research should explore the drivers for this change in diagnostic behavior and the reasons prompting investigation of vitamin D status in clinical practice."

Reference

  1. Basatemur E, Horsfall L, Marston L, et al. Trends in the diagnosis of vitamin D deficiency. Pediatrics. 2017. doi:10.1542/peds.2016-2748
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