Top 8 mobile apps for nurse practitioner students

  • uCentral

    uCentral

    This app is a compilation of many reference materials such as the Davis Drug Guide, Tabers, five-minute consults and the latest guidelines. Available for <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/ucentral-medical-references/id301867156?mt=8" target="_blank">Apple</a> and <a href="https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.unbound.android.ubub" target="_blank">Android</a>. Cost: Requires institutional subscription -- $169.95 per year.

  • CDC Vaccine Schedules

    CDC Vaccine Schedules

    This app, managed directly by the CDC, is an awesome resource for understanding the latest updates to vaccine schedules. Available for <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/cdc-vaccine-schedules/id875273858?mt=8" target="_blank">Apple</a> and <a href="https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=gov.cdc.ncird.vaccineschedule" target="_blank">Android</a>. Cost: Free.

  • JNC8 2014 Hypertension Treatment

    JNC8 2014 Hypertension Treatment

    This app provides the latest recommendations for treating hypertension. Available for <a href="https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=appinventor.ai_AHSCBC.HypertensionTreatmentJNC8" target="_blank">Android</a>. Cost: Free.

  • ASCVD Risk Estimator

    ASCVD Risk Estimator

    This resource helps you figure out cardiovascular risk for your patients. It also provides guideline recommendations for treatment. Available for Apple and Android. Cost: Free. AHRQ ePSS – AHRQ: This app helps you figure out required or recommended preventative care tests or exams. Available for <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/ascvd-risk-estimator/id808875968?mt=8" target="_blank">Apple</a> and <a href="https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=org.acc.cvrisk" target="_blank">Android</a>. Cost: Free.

  • AHRQ ePSS – AHRQ

    AHRQ ePSS – AHRQ

    This app helps you figure out required or recommended preventative care tests or exams. Available for <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/ahrq-epss/id311852560?mt=8" target="_blank">Apple</a> and <a href="https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=gov.ahrq.epss" target="_blank">Android</a>. Cost: Free.

  • CDC STD Tx Guidelines

    CDC STD Tx Guidelines

    This resource provides up-to-date information on the latest guidelines for diagnosing and treating 21 sexually transmitted diseases and sexual assault. Available for <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/std-tx-guide/id655206856?mt=8" target="_blank">Apple</a> and <a href="https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=gov.cdc.oid.nchhstp.stdguide" target="_blank">Android</a>. Cost: Free.

  • Magnifier

    Magnifier

    I use this app to get a better picture of dermatological conditions. Magnifier uses your phone's camera zoom and flash settings to provide a better picture. This app will also let you take a picture of the magnified object so you can share it with your patient. Available for <a href="https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=mmapps.mobile.magnifier" target="_blank">Android</a>. Cost: Free.

  • MPR

    MPR

    This is a nifty drug reference book. The app is very simple to use, and it provides information on how to write a prescription for any drug. Available for <a href="http://www.empr.com/app/index.html" target="_blank">Apple and Android</a>. Cost: Free.

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One of the things I dread most on a clinical rotation day is my smart phone battery dying.


The very idea is frightening, and I am hesitant to even mention it for fear of it jinxing myself. I don't talk on my phone that often, and I'm not worried about missing a text — but the thought of losing access to my reference apps fills me with terror.


I don't know about anyone else, but the older I get the worse my memory gets. No matter how much I try, it's hard to recall new information. I don't see apps as a memory crutch, rather more of a safety net.


I've also found that my patients appreciate when I look something up, explain to them what I'm doing, and share the information with them right then and there.


I consider myself a technophile. I need the latest phone, and I enjoy saying, “I have an app for that." It seems that each semester I find a new favorite app. This had me thinking about which apps I use the most and which ones are the most helpful.


Not counting Angry Birds or Facebook, these are my favorite apps in random order.


I have no economic interest in any of these apps. As another week of classes and clinical days rolls around, I hope you all have much success and sufficient battery life to get through each day.


Sean P. L'Huillier, BSN, RN, CEN, is an emergency department nurse currently enrolled in Georgetown University's School of Nursing and Health Studies Family Nurse Practitioner Program.

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