Assessing a Comprehensive Long-Acting Reversible Contraceptive Program

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Although many participants are aware of the availability of LARC, misconceptions regarding side effects are still very common.
Although many participants are aware of the availability of LARC, misconceptions regarding side effects are still very common.
The following article is part of The Clinical Advisor's coverage from the 2018 American Association of Nurse Practitioners' annual meeting in Denver. Our staff will be reporting live on original research, case studies, and professional outreach and advocacy news from leading NPs in various therapeutic areas. Check back for ongoing updates from AANP 2018. 

DENVER — Misconceptions about side effects, effectiveness, and complications associated with long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) are common, according to research presented at the American Association of Nurse Practitioners (AANP) 2018 National Conference.

Kimberly Riebe, DNP, ARNP, FRNP-BC, NP-C, of Rush University College of Nursing in Chicago, conducted a comprehensive evaluation of the LARC program for Columbia/Boone County Health and Human Services in Missouri to understand patient views, knowledge, and interests in LARC.

A client survey was distributed to 67 individuals (1-to-1 interview questions were distributed to 7 women). Electronic health record reviews of 44 individuals currently enrolled a LARC program were also collected.

Nearly half of the participants reported experiencing worry with regard to LARC side effects (49%), while 35% reported a lack of awareness regarding effectiveness. Approximately one-third of survey respondents believed that their ability to conceive in the future would be affected by LARC use.

Women who were previously pregnant were more inclined to get LARC, and Medicaid recipients using LARC realized a 193% savings compared with women without insurance.

In light of the misconceptions and negative beliefs associated with LARC elicited through this survey, “[educational] interventions are needed to improve clients' beliefs and attitudes to facilitate better client-provide communication,” stated Dr Riebe. “Women who qualify for Medicaid should be encouraged to apply. Providers should utilize patient assistance programs through device manufacturers for uninsured, low-income women.”

For more coverage of AANP 2018, click here.

Reference

Riebe K. Comprehensive long acting reversible contraceptive program evaluation. Presented at the American Association of Nurse Practitioners 2018 National Conference. June 29-July 1, 2018; Denver, CO. 18.3.101.

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