Nursing Faculty Ill Prepared to Educate Students on Transgender Patient Care

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Nursing students who receive insufficient education about transgender patient care may not be equipped to provide effective care in the clinical setting.
Nursing students who receive insufficient education about transgender patient care may not be equipped to provide effective care in the clinical setting.
The following article is part of The Clinical Advisor's coverage from the 2018 American Association of Nurse Practitioners' annual meeting in Denver. Our staff will be reporting live on original research, case studies, and professional outreach and advocacy news from leading NPs in various therapeutic areas. Check back for ongoing updates from AANP 2018. 

DENVER — Nursing curricula often combine transgender patient care with general LGBTQ content, leading students to be underprepared to treat this demographic, according to research presented at the American Association of Nurse Practitioners (AANP) 2018 National Conference.

Vanessa Pomarico-Denino, MSN, ARPN, FNP-BC, FAANP, of Southern Connecticut State University in New Haven, conducted a qualitative analysis to assess reasons why nurse educators would either incorporate or omit transgender care content when teaching students.

Using open-ended questions, qualitative analyses included nurse educator perceptions, knowledge, and biases about transgender patient care in baccalaureate education settings.

Results suggest that transgender content coverage is brief and combined with general LGBTQ information, leaving students with little education on how to manage issues specific to this population. In addition, the author reports that educators most often follow a National Council  Licensure Examination (NCLEX)-specific curriculum, creating the potential for omission of topics that are not specific to the NCLEX.

No association was reported between public, private, or faith-based institutions and availability of transgender patient care content.

“It is important that nursing students at all levels learn how to appropriately care for this under-served and often marginalized population,” the author stated.  “The Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, the American Nurses Association, and the National League of Nursing should consider including this specific population in their competency documents and position statements for baccalaureate nursing education,” she concluded.

For more coverage of AANP 2018, click here.

Reference

Pomarico-Denino V. Transgender education in nursing: a qualitative study investigating faculty beliefs. Presented at the American Association of Nurse Practitioners 2018 National Conference. June 29-July 1, 2018; Denver, CO. Poster presentation 18.3.103.

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