Cardiovascular Pearls Archive

Subtle signs of a failing heart

Subtle signs of a failing heart

Complaints about lack of sleep and postnasal drip may describe worsening heart failure.

What does a pleural rub sound like?

What does a pleural rub sound like?


A straightforward simile to help young clinicians learn what to listen for when auscultating a patient.

Detecting abnormal heart sounds

Detecting abnormal heart sounds

Picking up such low-pitched heart sounds can be difficult. Read this tip for clearer listening.

What aortic stenosis sounds like

What aortic stenosis sounds like


Differentiating systolic heart murmurs can be challenging.

Craving ice may signal anemia

Craving ice may signal anemia

Ask patients who present with fatigue about abnormal cravings for ice.

Prevent DVT in patients with folic-acid deficiency

Prevent DVT in patients with folic-acid deficiency

Detecting deep vein thrombosis early can aid prevention efforts.

Polishing off a sticky situation

Polishing off a sticky situation

Patients often complain they have a difficult time completely removing the adhesive from ECG pads. Pass on this simple tip for painless removal.

Plumbing for atherosclerosis

Using plumbing as an analogy for atherosclerosis can help improve treatment adherence.

Illustrating coronary anatomy

A helpful analogy for helping patients understand coronary anatomy.

Ice down dyspnea

A nurse offers a surprising, yet effective solution for helping patients catch their breath.

Freezing fish-oil capsules

Advise patients who are bothered by the fishy taste of omega-3 fish oil capsules to freeze the supplements.

A visual hypertension warning

A nurse practitioner offers an easy tip to help increase patient adherence to antihypertensive medication by enabling them to visualize their condition.

Preventing drug confusion

Many providers confuse metoprolol tartrate and metoprolol succinate. Learn an easy way to keep them straight.

An EAASY way to prevent blood clots

Solutions for prevent blood clots on long flights.

Managing hyponatremia

Some individuals develop hyponatremia when on a diuretic — not because the sodium level is diluted, but because the diuretic causes the sodium to be excreted with the excess fluid.

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