Azelastine HCl 0.15% nasal spray showed rapid onset of action in relieving nasal symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR). It was also well tolerated and without safety concerns, according to study findings presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (ACAAI) 2022 Annual Scientific Meeting, held from November 10 to 14, in Louisville, Kentucky.

Researchers assessed how quickly azelastine HCl 0.15% could relieve nasal symptoms of SAR. The primary endpoint was time from baseline to azelastine’s onset of the usefulness, which researchers assessed by comparing azelastine and placebo with respect to the change from baseline in total nasal symptom score.

The investigators conducted a single-center, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 110 adult participants (18-65 years of age), who were randomly assigned to receive azelastine HCl 0.15% or placebo nasal spray after continuous exposure to ragweed pollen in an environmental exposure chamber.


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The rapid onset of action for the relief of allergy symptoms combined with a safe side effect profile indicate azelastine HCl 0.15% is a valuable treatment option for allergic rhinitis.

The researchers saw a statistically significant improvement in total nasal symptom scores in the azelastine group vs the placebo group starting from 30 minutes post-dose (P =.0002). This effect was sustained through 240 minutes post-dose (P =.0001). Adverse events (AEs) were consistent with the known safety profile, and none of the AEs were serious, the study authors reported.

The researchers concluded that “Azelastine HCl 0.15% nasal spray was well tolerated and there were no safety concerns raised during this SAR study.” They added that “The rapid onset of action for the relief of allergy symptoms combined with a safe side effect profile indicate azelastine HCl 0.15% is a valuable treatment option for allergic rhinitis.

Reference

Hsu S, Stevens D, Sajjad F, Salapatek A. Onset of action of azelastine HCl nasal spray 0.15% evaluated in an environmental exposure chamberAnn Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2022;125(5):S71. doi:10.1016/j.anai.2022.08.704

This article originally appeared on Pulmonology Advisor