A maintenance and reliever digital system (MRDS) shows greater odds of inducing meaningful clinical improvements in patients with asthma after 6 months vs standard of care (SoC) maintenance and reliever inhalers, according to study findings presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (ACAAI) Annual Scientific Meeting, held from November 10 to 14, 2022, in Louisville, Kentucky.

Researchers conducted the randomized prospective CONNECT2 study (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04677959) that comprised 391 participants aged at least 13 years with suboptimal asthma control measured by the Asthma Control Test (ACT). Participants were randomly assigned to receive either MRDS (n=210) SoC (n=181). They used Bayesian statistical analysis to determine a posterior probability distribution for odds ratios with corresponding credible intervals (CrI).

The primary endpoint was the probability of greater odds of reaching significant improvement in asthma control at 6 months. Meaningful improvement was defined as an ACT score greater than or equal to 20 or an increase of at least 3 units at 6 months from the ACT baseline score.


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After 6 months, participants using the MRDS had greater odds of clinically meaningful improvements in asthma control vs SoC.

The researchers found an 88.7% probability of greater odds of achieving improvements in asthma control for participants receiving MRDS vs those receiving SoC after 6 months (mean odds ratio [MRDS/SoC], 1.35, 95% CrI, 0.846-2.038). This ratio reflected an average of 35% higher odds of achieving meaningful asthma control improvement for participants in the MRDS group vs those in the SoC group.

The study authors conclude, “After 6 months, participants using the MRDS had greater odds of clinically meaningful improvements in asthma control vs SoC.”

Reference

Mosnaim G, Hoyte F, Safioti G, et al. Effectiveness of a maintenance and reliever digital system to improve asthma controlAnn Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2022;125(5):S40-S41. doi:10.1016/j.anai.2022.08.619

This article originally appeared on Pulmonology Advisor