Endoscopic sinus surgery may substantially improve quality of life for patients with chronic rhinosinusitis and obstructive sleep apnea, researchers reported online September 10 in JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery. 


Timothy L. Smith, MD, MPH, and colleagues investigated the impact of comorbid obstructive sleep apnea on quality of life in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis following functional endoscopic sinus surgery. The study included 405 patients with chronic rhinosinusitis who had the surgery. Of these participants, 60 (15%) had comorbid obstructive sleep apnea. During an average of 13.7 months of follow-up, 285 participants (70%) responded to preoperative and postoperative surveys. 


No difference was observed between those with and without obstructive sleep apnea in disease severity or quality of life specific to chronic rhinosinusitis, poor sleep, or average sleep quality before surgery. Following the surgery, the researchers noted statistically significant gains in quality of life and disease severity in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with and without obstructive sleep apnea. Participants without obstructive sleep apnea reported greater improvements on sleep quality. 


“Patients with obstructive sleep apnea should be treated concurrently for both chronic rhinosinusitis and obstructive sleep apnea to optimize sleep dysfunction and quality of life improvement,” the authors wrote.