Smoking screening beneficial in pediatric pulmonology clinics

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Postsurvey results show that 38% of patients/families were interested in quitting smoking, and 100% stated that they spoke to a staff member about ways to reduce smoke exposure to the patient.
Postsurvey results show that 38% of patients/families were interested in quitting smoking, and 100% stated that they spoke to a staff member about ways to reduce smoke exposure to the patient.
The following article is part of The Clinical Advisor's coverage from the National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners' 39th National Conference on Pediatric Health Care in Chicago. Our staff will be reporting live on the latest news and clinically relevant practice information from leading pediatric NPs in many specialty areas. Check back for ongoing updates from NAPNAP 2018. 

CHICAGO—Screening for tobacco use in pediatric pulmonology clinics will help decrease medical expenses and hospital admissions for illnesses that can be triggered from smoke exposure, according to research published at the National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners' 39th National Conference on Pediatric Health Care.

Jamila Smith-Young, MSN, MPH, PNP-AC, and Sharon Hogue, MSN, PNP-PC, conducted a quality improvement project that consisted of randomly surveying 100 patients and their family at the end of their pulmonology clinic visit prior to and after implementing a smoking cessation process. The surveys were designed to teach the pediatric patient about smoke exposure through counseling during their clinic visit and assess if interventions for cessation were offered by staff.

After education was completed, the researchers aimed to screen all patients for smoke exposure during pulmonology clinic visits. If smoking was identified inside or outside the home, smoking cessation tools including counseling and state Quitline enrollment forms were provided to the patient and their families.

Presurvey results showed that 88% of patients/families were asked about household smoking during their clinic visit; 52% were interested in quitting; and 20% stated they received information about ways to quit (signing up for resources from the Quitline).

Postsurvey results showed that 97% of patients/families were asked about household smoking during their clinic visit; 38% were interested in quitting; and 100% stated that they spoke to a staff member about ways to reduce smoke exposure to the patient.

“This change not only benefits the patient but the family member that is willing to commit to smoking cessation,” the authors concluded.

Visit The Clinical Advisor's conference section for continuous coverage from NAPNAP 2018


Reference

Smith-Young J, Hogue, S. Measures to eliminate tobacco use and exposure in pediatric pulmonology patients. Presented at the National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners 2018 National Conference; March 19-22, 2018; Chicago.

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