Metabolic Health Predicative of Cognitive Development in Children

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Among non-Hispanic white children, fasting glucose, insulin, and Homeostatic Model of Assessment for Insulin levels were inversely linked with scores for inhibitory control.
Among non-Hispanic white children, fasting glucose, insulin, and Homeostatic Model of Assessment for Insulin levels were inversely linked with scores for inhibitory control.
The following article is part of conference coverage from the American Diabetes Association's 78th Scientific Sessions (ADA 2018) in Orlando,Florida. Endocrinology Advisor's staff will report on medical research and technological advances in diabetes and diabetes education, conducted by experts in the field. Check back for the latest news from ADA 2018.

Metabolic health may have an impact on cognitive development in pediatric patients, according to research presented at the American Diabetes Association's 78th Scientific Sessions held in Orlando, Florida, June 22-26, 2018.

Researchers assessed whether current metabolic parameters, including fasting glucose, insulin, and Homeostatic Model of Assessment for Insulin Resistance levels, are inversely associated with cognitive functioning, as measured using the National Institutes of Health Toolbox cognition battery. Researchers used data from 4- to 6-year-old healthy children (n=98) participating in the Healthy Start study.

Among non-Hispanic white children (n=53), fasting glucose, insulin, and Homeostatic Model of Assessment for Insulin Resistance levels were inversely linked with scores for inhibitory control (β = -3.16, β = -4.46; β = -3.90; P <.05 for all). Fasting glucose level was also linked with lower language scores (β = -3.88, P <.05).

Among children of other racial groups (n=45), only fasting glucose measure was significantly associated with lower cognitive flexibility scores (β = -4.19, P <.05).

“Our data suggest that metabolic health may [have an] impact [on] cognitive development in young children,” wrote lead researcher, Allison LB Shapiro, MPH, PhD.

For more coverage of ADA 2018, click here. 

Reference

Shapiro ALB, Wilkening G, Tregellas JR, et al. Childhood metabolic markers are associated with performance on cognitive tasks in young children – the Healthy Start Study. Presented at: ADA 78th Scientific Sessions; June 22-26, 2018; Orlando, FL. Abstract 1334-P.

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