March 03, 2007 Archives - Page 5 of 8 - Clinical Advisor

Print Issue: March 03, 2007

Dysphagia

Dr. Alper is medical director of clinical reference products for EBSCO Publishing, in Ipswich, Mass., and editor-in-chief of DynaMed (www.dynamicmedical.com), a database of comprehensive updated summaries covering nearly 2,000 clinical topics. Dr. Studt is a physician in the Occupational Medicine Department, Marshfield Clinic, Eau Claire, Wis., and a reviewer for DynaMed. ICD-9 code 787.2 dysphagia…

Herpes simplex virus linked to dementia

The herpes simplex type 1 virus (HSV-1) that causes cold sores may increase susceptibility to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) if a particular variant of a specific gene is also present. The variant, known as ApoE4, has been linked to AD for some time. In fact, according to some scientists, evidence points to ApoE4 as a contributing,…

Fibroid embolization fails in many patients

Embolization, a relatively new therapy for fibroid tumors that cuts off their blood supply, leads to quicker and less painful recoveries than hysterectomy. But the tumors often return. A team of researchers in Scotland studied 157 fibroid patients in 27 hospitals in the United Kingdom. Two thirds of the women were randomly assigned to uterine-artery…

Statins prevent advanced prostate cancer

Statins do not reduce the chances of developing prostate cancer, but they dramatically cut the rate of lethal advanced disease, data show. Epidemiologists at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore identified all 2,579 men in the 35,000-member Health Professionals Follow-up Study who had developed prostate cancer over a 12-year period ending…

Baldness drug throws off PSA

As little as 1 mg/day of finasteride can seriously distort results of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing, a study shows. That’s the dosage of Propecia used by more than 4 million men to treat male-pattern baldness, and shown by the study to lower serum PSA concentrations by as much as half. Finasteride is also sold as…

High uric acid may increase BP

Serum uric acid is strongly linked to hypertension in African Americans, a large, multicenter study shows. The finding suggests that a simple blood test could predict high BP risk and that lowering uric acid could be a novel way to reduce hypertension-related complications in this population. The findings come from a study of 9,104 African…

Apnea patients can safely skip the sleep lab

People whose symptoms make it highly likely they have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can safely start treatment without first obtaining a confirmatory diagnosis in a sleep laboratory. So concludes a study in Vancouver, Canada, that found no difference in outcomes between OSA patients who had two nights of polysomnography (PSG) in a lab before starting…

Hip fractures linked to poor kidney function

When you’re assessing older women for the risk of hip fracture, renal dysfunction is a red flag. That’s the message from a multi-center study of 300 randomly selected women aged 65 and older who experienced fractures during a six-year follow-up period. The women lived in Portland, Ore., Monongahela Valley, Pa., Baltimore, and Minneapolis. When researchers…

Drug abusers incur yet another curse

A few case histories have suggested that drug abuse causes pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), but there’s been no solid evidence—until now. Researchers in San Diego documented a strong link between PAH in adults and the chronic use of amphetamine, methamphetamine, or cocaine. By combing the charts of every patient older than 18 years with PAH…

Growth hormone does more harm than good

Despite its popularity, growth hormone (GH) doesn’t work as an anti-aging agent and causes serious side effects in healthy people, a review of the literature has found. The most common side effects are soft-tissue edema and arthralgias, but users were also more likely than nonusers to suffer carpal tunnel syndrome and gynecomastia, as well as…

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