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Dermatologic Look-Alikes

Erythematous Plaques

Two cases of male patients with a worsening rash are presented; can you diagnose the conditions?
Infectious Diseases

Stevens Johnson Syndrome/Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis

OVERVIEW: What every practitioner needs to know# Are you sure your patient has Stevens–Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis? What should you expect to find? Stevens–Johnson Syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are severe reactive blistering diseases along a continuum of disease severity. They are uncommon to rare conditions in the general population with increased incidence…
Dermatology

Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (TEN, Lyell's syndrome, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, SJS)

Are You Confident of the Diagnosis? What you should be alert for in the history Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are severe and sometimes life-threatening dermatoses that are caused by medication. They are characterized by sometimes extensive detachment of the epidermis and mucosal epithelia. The time to onset of the eruption is…
Evidence-Based Medicine

DANGEROUS SKIN REACTIONS WITH CARBAMAZEPINE AND HLA-B*1502 ALLELE POSSIBLE

Dangerous or even fatal skin reactions (Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis) with carbamazepine (Tegretol, Carbatrol) are significantly more common in patients with the HLA allele B*1502, based on an FDA MedWatch notice and FDA Press Release (FDA MedWatch 2007 December 12; full-text available online at: www.fda.gov/medwatch/safety/2007/safety07.htm#carbamazepine, FDA Press Release 2007 Dec 12; full-text available…
Web Exclusives

FDA panel gives second hepatitis C drug green light

The FDA's Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee unanimously voted that a second protease inhibitor, telaprevir, is safe and effective for treating patients with hepatitis C virus genotype 1.
Web Exclusives

Telaprevir gets FDA nod for hepatitis C

The FDA has approved telaprevir (Incivek, Vertex), the second direct acting protease inhibitor to be granted agency approval this month to treat adults with chronic hepatitis C infections.
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