Chemotherapy Induced Alopecia (CIA) - Clinical Advisor

Chemotherapy Induced Alopecia (CIA)

Slideshow

  • Hair has been a social symbol throughout time, cultivating perceptions of age, social status, beliefs, and more importantly, individuality and a sense of attractiveness.1

    Slide 1: The Importance of Hair

    Hair has been a social symbol throughout time, cultivating perceptions of age, social status, beliefs, and more importantly, individuality and a sense of attractiveness.1

  • Chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA) is one of the more troubling aspects of chemotherapy to patients.2 While hair loss may seem trivial, it can lead to poor self esteem and ultimately unwanted psychological effects.2

    Slide 2: The Patient’s Point of View

    Chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA) is one of the more troubling aspects of chemotherapy to patients.2 While hair loss may seem trivial, it can lead to poor self esteem and ultimately unwanted psychological effects.2

  • Normal hair growth is comprised of three phases: 1) Anagen, 2) Catagen and 3) Telogen.3 Exogen then occurs when hair is released from the follicle.3

    Slide 3: Hair Anatomy and Physiology

    Normal hair growth is comprised of three phases: 1) Anagen, 2) Catagen and 3) Telogen.3 Exogen then occurs when hair is released from the follicle.3

  • The anagen phase is primarily affected in CIA, which is thought to result from the disruption of matrix cells proliferation and Pohl-Pinkus constrictions, which is characterized by diminished follicle function.3

    Slide 4: Pathophysiology of CIA

    The anagen phase is primarily affected in CIA, which is thought to result from the disruption of matrix cells proliferation and Pohl-Pinkus constrictions, which is characterized by diminished follicle function.3

  • This is a listing of some agents that may cause CIA.6

    Slide 5: Chemotherapeutic Agents Causing CIA

    This is a listing of some agents that may cause CIA.6

  • CIA is graded based by severity and need for camouflage. Grade 1 is defined by hair loss of >50% that is noticeable upon close inspection; grade 2 is characterized by hair loss of >50% that is readily noticeable, requires camouflage to conceal loss, and causes psychosocial impact.5

    Slide 6: Grading of CIA

    CIA is graded based by severity and need for camouflage. Grade 1 is defined by hair loss of >50% that is noticeable upon close inspection; grade 2 is characterized by hair loss of >50% that is readily noticeable, requires camouflage to conceal loss, and causes psychosocial impact.5

  • Minoxidil therapy requires daily application, as discontinuation can lead to loss of benefits obtained.7

    Slide 7: Topical Treatments

    Minoxidil therapy requires daily application, as discontinuation can lead to loss of benefits obtained.7

  • Scalp cooling may help reduce hair loss in some patients receiving chemotherapy.8

    Slide 8: Scalp Cooling as Treatment for CIA

    Scalp cooling may help reduce hair loss in some patients receiving chemotherapy.8

  • Slide

Compared to the severe adverse effects of chemotherapy, chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA) is surprisingly one of the more troubling aspects of chemotherapy to patients. Learn more about it with this slideshow.

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